SharePoint, Office 365, Azure, and Front end JS geek. – Chicago IL
SharePoint, Office 365, Azure, and Front end JS geek. – Chicago IL

Development

SharePoint as a Service (SPaaS)

SharePoint is often treated as a final SAAS product to perform Microsoft native functions only.  Management can be reluctant to engage customization and development for the perceived cost. 

However, what is the cost of lacking a needed business tool?  Lost productivity and opportunity?  

What is the cost to create native SP features?   Make a blank IIS website?  Then create your own search, audit, permission interface, file store, REST endpoint, etc.?

 

Today is the best time ever to be a developer.  Many services and many tools.   Agile design can be applied to leverage 90% native platform with 10% custom code to spin up helpful business applications with low cost.   Micro services, REST api, and JavaScript frameworks provide the building blocks.   Developers are challenged to learn these new tools.  Ones that do can help deliver business value faster than ever.

 

Remember, SharePoint is a service– not the final product. 

shades_smile

 

Features

  • Authentication – User context.  Password management, new account creation, integrated single sign-on.
  • Permissions – Groups, roles, custom permission levels,
  • Tables & Files – Storage of flat database (rows, columns, validated input, query) and binary files (folder, files)
  • Notification – Alert on data changes.  Daily and weekly summary.  Custom email body with Workflow.
  • Search – Index content, word parsing, custom results display, full REST api.
  • Audit – Regulatory compliance.  Reports, export, filter, and granular detail.
  • … and many more

 

Diagram

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References

SharePoint 2013 – App Model 3 Tier Diagram

I needed a quick reference to introduce developers with the SharePoint 2013 App Model. 

For traditional ASP.Net and Dot Net coders there is a wide philosophy gap to cross when considering new applications written mostly in front-end JavaScript, HTML, and CSS.   Instead of coding “in” SharePoint (to augment the core product) we now code “next to” SharePoint (with additive REST/JSON endpoints).  

The stability which comes from this approach is significant.  We wan to run on-premise SharePoint similar to how Microsoft operates Office 365.   No more SharePoint customization lost during patching.   No more late night WSP and IISRESET outages.   Code can be modified more fluidly and IE breakpoints can even be set at a single user’s desktop when troubleshooting.   Exciting and powerful tools – which require a new way of thinking.

Please fee free to download the poster I made below.   Hope you find it helpful! 

shades_smile

 

12-27-2014 3-07-04 PM

Merry Christmas – HTML5, JS, and CSS3

I wanted to thank all of you for reading my blog and wishing you a Happy Holiday season.   After passing exam 070-480 about HTML5, it seemed like a great time to practice new skills and draw a <CANVAS> based Christmas Tree here.   Enjoy!  

Smile

 

Screenshot of what it should look like:

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Code behind:

 

Live working demo:



Merry Christmas!

Say Happy Birthday with Code!

Most people just say “Happy Birthday” to each other over social networks like Facebook and Twitter with the same 14 predictable letters.   Why not say it with code?   If you’re a developer you already understand.  

Smile

   Before you ask … Yes, I really did write and run the QBasic 4.5 version in 16-bit mode running www.DosBox.com on Windows 7 x64.   Oh, and no it’s not my birthday.

 

With PowerShell

With C# Console Application

With JavaScript

With Command Prompt

With QBasic 4.5  (oh yes I did!)

 

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© Copyright 2016
@ SPJeff

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